How Collateral Impacts Mortgage Loan Qualification

Collateral

When you obtain a mortgage loan to purchase a home, the collateral used to secure the loan is the house. If you fail to make payments and default on your loan, your lender has the option to claim ownership of the house due to its security interest.

Collateral = your home  –  this is the what secures the mortgage loan in case you don’t make your payments
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How your ability to repay impacts your ability qualify for a mortgage loan.

Quick Facts video 3: How capacity (your ability to repay) impacts your ability qualify for a mortgage loan.

How likely are you to be able to pay back your mortgage?  Steady employment is the best determinant of your ability to repay.  W2 wage earners are viewed as most stable from an underwriting standpoint because their income is easily documented.  Overtime, commission, and self employment income are considered less stable and are more difficult to document.

YES!               W2’s and tax returns prove steady employment

Maybe             Overtime, commission, self employment

NO way!         stated income loans (no documentation)

In our current market, full income documentation in the form of W2s and/or tax returns are required whether you’re self-employed or a wage earner. Stated income programs, which don’t require proof of income, are a thing of the past.

What is DTI?  Debt-To-Income ratio or DTI expressed as a percentage is the most important ratio to know when qualifying for a mortgage. You compute your DTI by dividing your total monthly obligations by your monthly before-tax income.

Debt-To-Income Ratio or DTI  =  Monthly obligations / Monthly pre-tax income

For example, if a borrower has a $250 auto payment, $150 in credit card payments, and a mortgage payment of $850 per month, then monthly obligations total $1,250. If your gross income is $4,000 a month then your debt to income ratio is 32%. A good rule of thumb is that you want a DTI no higher than 40%.

$250 + $150 + $850 = $1250 (monthly obligations)  /  $4,000 Monthly Income (pre-tax)  = 32%

Recommended DTI is 40% or less.

Another factor that impacts your ability to repay is the amount of liquid assets you have. Lenders want to see that you have enough cash reserves to cover your mortgage in “case of a rainy day”. Acceptable assets for reserves include checking, savings, and retirement accounts, as well as any other liquid cash accounts.

Saving for a rainy day pays off!

Checking, Savings, and Retirement Accounts as well as any other liquid assets make you more likely to be able to repay your mortgage.

Thanks for viewing our quick facts Capacity video, I hope you found it helpful.  If you have any questions please feel free to call us, our loan officers are friendly and ready to help!

Our loan officers are happy to answer any questions!  So give us a call at 800-Homestead-8! (A text file of this video can be found on our website)

How do I get approved for a mortgage & improve my credit?

Quick facts video 2 – How do I get approved for a mortgage loan and improve my credit score?

How does my credit score impact my ability to qualify for a mortgage?

Let’s start with some basic information about credit.

There are three major credit bureaus:  Equifax, Experian, and TransUnion.

These credit bureaus document payment histories for mortgages, auto loans, personal loans, credit cards, and other consumer debt.  They also track and report derogatory information such as collections, foreclosures, judgments, charge offs, liens and bankruptcies.  From this compilation of debt and payment history a credit score is computed.

My credit history (list below) rent, utilities, mastercard, visa, student loans,

OH NO!!! (list below)  collections, foreclosures, judgments, bankruptcies…

Understanding credit scores

Credit scores range from 300 to 850 and have proven to be highly predictive of future repayment performance.  Lenders therefore depend on an individual’s credit score to determine the risk of a borrower defaulting on their mortgage loan.

In the past a credit score of 580 was commonly used as the lowest score acceptable for obtaining a mortgage, however after the 2008 mortgage crisis this score is now considered too risky and a score of at least 640 is now typically required.  Scores above 720 are considered “good” credit since they represent a low risk of default and therefore the best pricing is obtained by borrowers with the highest credit scores.

300 NO WAY!

580 Sorry – won’t work today

640 Acceptable – but by improving your score – you could save!

720 WAY TO GO! That’s going to save you some bucks!

850 Are you kidding? You go you little credit master!

How do I improve my credit score?

  1. Well – make payments on time! This may seem obvious to some, but making your payments consistently on-time over the years is the most critical component of your credit score.
  2. Check your credit on a regular basis and if there are any errors have them corrected immediately.  Federal law entitles you to one free credit report annually which can be ordered at freecreditscore.com
  3. Keep your credit card balances to no more than 1/3 of the outstanding limit. Maxing out your available credit negatively impacts your credit score, even if you pay your bills on time.
  4. Don’t close that account!  Keeping revolving accounts open especially over time improves your score.
In brief 

1. Make Payments ON TIME!!

2. Check your credit at freecreditscore.com.

3. If your Visa limit is $15,000 don’t let your balance go above $5,000.  Maxing out your cards damages your credit score!

4. Don’t close that account, even infrequently used accounts can improve your score.

Thanks for viewing our quick facts Credit video, I hope you found it helpful.  If you have any questions please feel free to call us, our loan officers are friendly and ready to help!

Our loan officers are happy to answer any questions!  So give us a call at 800-Homestead-8! (A text file of this video can be found on our website)

 

What is an ARM? Should I consider getting an ARM?

Adjustable Rate Mortgages (arm)

An ARM loan or Adjustable Rate Mortgage,  is a mortgage with a rate that can adjust. While the term has been vilified as one of the causes of the dreaded, “mortgage meltdown”, not all ARM’s carry mortgage rates that are unreasonable. Just like most anything, all it takes is a little effort to understand the different ARM programs and to see if they would be beneficial to you./wp-admin/post.php?post=669&action=edit#

To understand an ARM correctly, we need a few definitions along with our example:

John, in Chesterfield Missouri, has a mortgage application that has a start rate of 2.50%, 5/1 ARM with 5/2/5 “Caps”, and 2.75% “Margin” with the 1 Year US Treasury as the “Index”.

Index

An Index is a guide used to measure interest rates. Examples of interest rate changes are, 1 year LIBOR(London Interbank Offered Rate, 1 year treasury, and Prime).  This is available on any financial website. Your interest rate is computed based on the index, the month before your adjustment period ends.

Margin

An easy way of thinking of Margin is as the lender’s markup on funds.  It’s added to the index. If you don’t know your index, its normally available on your note, or ask you loan officer if you are yet to close. This is where you need to pay close attention. Abusive lending practices were introduced into margins. A normal margin is about 2.75%, however during the time where the causes of the mortgage meltdown happened, some margins were as high as 8%.

Adjustment Period

The adjustment period is the disclosure of periods the rate is fixed before it adjusts. In our example, John from Chesterfield Missouri mortgage has a 5/1 ARM means the interest rate is 2.5% for the first 5 years, adjusting on the 61st month, then every 1 year thereafter.

Interest rate Caps

Cap on a mortgage discloses the maximum percentage an ARM can adjust per period and over the life of the loan, or “Capped”.  For example, the 5/2/5 caps means John in Chesterfield’s ARM can’t adjust to more than 7.5% on the first adjustment, no more that 2% per year thereafter, and no more than 7.5% over the life of the loan. Again, this is also a place to pay close attention. ARM caps are there to protect the consumer against unreasonable interest rate jumps. A normal ARM cap for the 1st adjustment is 2-5%. During the pre-mortgage meltdown days, we saw no cap and a life cap of up to 18%!

So How is my ARM rate computed?

Index + Margin = Interest rate, limited by the interest rate cap.

So, using our example above.  John from St. Louis (Chesterfield) has had his ARM mortgage for 5 years now and the US Treasury is at 1%.  So Index of 1 + margin of 2.75=3.75% will be John’s new interest rate for the next 12 months.

When Should I choose an ARM?

Provided this isn’t your first rodeo owning and financing a home, you could consider and ARM if:

  1. You plan on being in your home for the a time period less that the fixed period of the ARM. Say, if you are planning on moving in 4 years, a 5/1 ARM may work well for you.
  2. You have additional income coming in soon. Say, you are first in line for the next promotion and Junior’s college fund has not yet been fully funded.

So, to conclude, ARM’s aren’t for everybody, and they can have some tricky parts. However, provided you’ve done your research, they can be of benefit in the right circumstances.