Renovation Mortgage

Why a Renovation Mortgage Could be Perfect for Your Purchase

Numbers you should remember: $110k, $50k and $220k

In this 2017, inventory challenged market, a renovation mortgage is becoming more and more of an option for you to turn an ordinary house into the home of your dreams.

What is a Renovation Mortgage?

Simply (as possible) put, a renovation mortgage is a transaction where you finance in the improvements. However, in order for the lender to take on the risk, the funds are held in escrow and disbursed in progress payments as the work is completed, phase by phase.

The name of the products are either a 203k (FHA) or Homestyle (Conventional)

 

So, how does a Renovation Mortgage work?

In the case of a purchase, you can buy a beaten down home, usually a foreclosure or a home that is dated or otherwise in some state of disrepair.

Purchase Price $110,000

You can get a bid from a contractor for say $50,000 to improve the home to your specifications.

This means you’re financing $160,000.

After the home is complete, the home then becomes worth say $220,000.

Why might this be the perfect option for you in today’s housing market?

In every corner of the real estate market, all we are hearing is “inventory shortage, inventory shortage”! This option can help you turn the house that no one wants, into the home you love!

Buy a home for less than rent

Buying a Home for less per Month than your Rent by the Numbers

This statement always raises an eyebrow…or 10, when I say in this market, with just a moderate down payment, you can buy a home for less than what you pay in rent.
 

Buy a home for less than rent

This is how it comes out by the numbers:

Let’s take a $175,000 house in this market, assuming a 5% down payment.

Principal and Interest  @4.25 817.88
Taxes @1.25% 182.29
Insurance  100.00
Mortgage Insurance    81.74
Total     $1,181.88

 

Lets compare that to a reasonable rent payment in this market of $1,250. This is how we come to prove the statement that you can buy a home for less than your rent.

Even further, after the tax benefits of mortgage interest, and the doors which this immensely valuable deduction opens, the net effect means an amazing savings to the home buyer over renting.

For more information, check out HomesteadU

The Fifteen Most Commonly Asked Questions by First Time Home Buyers – Part 3

In “The Fifteen Most Commonly Asked Questions by First-Time Homebuyers Part II,” we discussed down payments, loan qualification, working with Homestead mortgage and mortgage costs. In this article we’ll discuss what first time home buyers should take with them when they are ready to apply for a mortgage, how to determine which mortgage is best for you, how much to offer when you find the home you want, what to do if your offer is rejected and what to expect at closing.Continue reading

The Fifteen Most Commonly Asked Questions by First-Time Homebuyers – Part 2

In “The Fifteen Most Commonly Asked Questions by First-Time Homebuyers Part I,” we discussed the tax benefits of home ownership, HUD homes, buying a home with bad credit, home ownership for single parents and working with a real estate broker. In “The Fifteen Most Commonly Asked Questions by First-Time Homebuyers Part II,” we’ll discuss down payments, loan qualification, working with Homestead mortgage and mortgage costs.Continue reading

Tips for Buying Your First Home

With depressed real estate markets across the country and an often confusing process, purchasing a home is a much scarier prospect than it used to be for first-time home buyers. Knowing the steps to take to get you to your goal is essential. Here is a road map to help you prepare to buy your first home.

When it comes to buying a home it seems like you have to put the tail before the dog. In other words you should figure out how much house you can afford and a lender who will loan you money at an attractive rate with good terms before you go house hunting. Some people are lucky enough to have generous parents or grandparents give them the cash they need for a down payment while others find a seller willing to help them with closing costs. Continue reading

What is Private Mortgage Insurance and why am I paying it?

Clinically put, Private Mortgage Insurance, or PMI or MI, is insurance that will help to protect a lender from loss in the case of a default by the borrower. MI is almost always required on loans with less than twenty percent equity. That means, if you are purchasing a home with less than twenty percent down or refinancing to more than eighty percent of your home’s value, you will be required to pay mortgage insurance. While it is a payment that the borrower pays to insure another party, it does have its benefits.

How is mortgage insurance charged?

There are a couple of ways MI is charged. There is Monthly MI, which is computed based on various factors such as credit score, LTV(Loan to Value), and term, then there is MIP(Mortgage Insurance Premium) which is charged up front, and most of the time added to the loan amount. Some programs charge one or the other, while some, (Gulp) charge both. In some cases, there is an add on to the interest rate which pays the premium, called Lender Paid MI. (LPMI)

Why should I pay MI?

Simply put, if you don’t have 20% to put down on a mortgage when you purchase or refinance, then be happy you get to pay MI. For example, in Kansas City and St. Louis, the average home sales price is right at $145,000. I don’t know about you, but I didn’t have 20% down ($29,000) sitting around in my checking when I purchased my first home.

Having MI to purchase a home allows most buyers to get into a home with as little as 2.5% down in some cases. So without the benefit of MI, purchasing a new home would be very difficult.

However, here are some tips to be as efficient as you can with the premiums you pay.

How to pay as little MI as possible

  1. Save as much money as you can. The larger the down payment, the lower the MI, and/or MIP.
  2. Keep your credit score as high as possible. Remember, the minimum score to get a home loan these days is 640. The higher the score, the lower the MI.

How to get out of paying MI if you are already paying

  1. Most MI contracts cancel when you pay the loan amount down to 78% of the original value of the home at purchase or value on the last refi. However, that takes almost 10 years if you put down 5%.
  2. The 2nd way to get out of paying MI, is by refinancing your home assuming you have built up 20% equity through a combination of principle payments and appreciation. However if you are content with your existing loan, you should call your lender to see on what conditions they will cancel your MI.

To summarize, while MI is a premium you pay to insure someone else’s interest, it helps people buy homes and refinance homes with less that 20% equity and with some good planning and discipline, there are ways to keep the premiums to a minimum.

How Can I Get a Mortgage if I’m Self Employed

For many small business owners, the economy has been tough. With tightening mortgage regulations, qualifying for a mortgage has been tougher, causing many applicants to ask, “How can I qualify for a mortgage if I’m self employed”.

Here are 5 tips for a smooth mortgage application for a self employed person.

1.      Understand the income you make:

Ever heard of the saying, “Give me the bottom line”? The saying has roots in the financial industry.  Sure you may have grossed $150,000 last year(Top Line), however, writing off $140,000, leaves you with a Bottom Line of….you guessed it $10,000. So lenders are forced to qualify a borrower making $10,000 per year which won’t buy you much of a home in this day and age.

Gone are the days of writing your income on a loan application with no supporting documentation. Today all qualifying income must be documented.Continue reading