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Homestead Financial Mortgage

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Why a Renovation Mortgage Could be Perfect for Your Purchase

Why a Renovation Mortgage Could be Perfect for Your Purchase

Numbers you should remember: $110k, $50k and $220k

In this 2017, inventory challenged market, a renovation mortgage is becoming more and more of an option for you to turn an ordinary house into the home of your dreams.

What is a Renovation Mortgage?

Simply (as possible) put, a renovation mortgage is a transaction where you finance in the improvements. However, in order for the lender to take on the risk, the funds are held in escrow and disbursed in progress payments as the work is completed, phase by phase.

The name of the products are either a 203k (FHA) or Homestyle (Conventional)

 

So, how does a Renovation Mortgage work?

In the case of a purchase, you can buy a beaten down home, usually a foreclosure or a home that is dated or otherwise in some state of disrepair.

Purchase Price $110,000

You can get a bid from a contractor for say $50,000 to improve the home to your specifications.

This means you’re financing $160,000.

After the home is complete, the home then becomes worth say $220,000.

Why might this be the perfect option for you in today’s housing market?

In every corner of the real estate market, all we are hearing is “inventory shortage, inventory shortage”! This option can help you turn the house that no one wants, into the home you love!

 

Buying a Home for less per Month than your Rent by the Numbers

This statement always raises an eyebrow…or 10, when I say in this market, with just a moderate down payment, you can buy a home for less than what you pay in rent.
 

Buy a home for less than rent

This is how it comes out by the numbers:

Let’s take a $175,000 house in this market, assuming a 5% down payment.

Principal and Interest  @4.25 817.88
Taxes @1.25% 182.29
Insurance  100.00
Mortgage Insurance    81.74
Total     $1,181.88

 

Lets compare that to a reasonable rent payment in this market of $1,250. This is how we come to prove the statement that you can buy a home for less than your rent.

Even further, after the tax benefits of mortgage interest, and the doors which this immensely valuable deduction opens, the net effect means an amazing savings to the home buyer over renting.

For more information, check out HomesteadU

I Didn’t get the Cash Out I Wanted on My Mortgage Refinance, What can I do?

I Didn’t get the Cash Out I Wanted on My Mortgage RefinanceSo those borrowers who would like to refinance and pull “Cash Out” of your home but were turned down or told the home didn’t appraise for enough, there are some options which you can do fairly quickly to change your outcome.

1. Increase your credit score.

Often, lenders have a limitation on how much cash they can lend, many times, it may be due to credit score. For example, you may be able to borrower up 70% of your home’s value at a 640 score on a conventional loan, but if you have above a 700+ score, you may be able to go up to 85%

2. Apply for a renovation loan.

Many borrowers just want the cash for home improvement, unaware that a renovation loan is what they need. In some cases a renovation loan appraisal can yield a much higher value because it can value the home, “subject to” the improvements being done which is rare. Due to the their technical nature, a renovation loan isn’t common. However, they can be well worth it, with the right circumstances.

3. Apply for a HELOC

A HELOC is a Home Equity Line Of Credit. This is technically a 2nd mortgage but has a lot more flexibility to pull cash out and repay. They also can go to a higher Loan-To-Value than most other products.

So, what do you do if this is you? Like anything when you are dealing with professional services…get a second opinion and ask them about any of the above options.

When the Going Gets Tough the Tough Buy HUD Homes – Part 1

When first time homebuyers start their search for a new home many are hesitant to consider looking at HUD homes because they are under the misconception that such properties

aren’tworth as much because they are located in blighted areas. This isn’t always true. The current housing market is flooded with HUD government foreclosures in areas at every price point, making a HUD home a viable option for achieving homeownership. Here are some things to consider when it comes purchasing a HUD home.

The good news about shopping for HUD homes is that there are plenty available on the market today. With so many HUD homes out there you’re bound to find one you like, making the dream of homeownership a reality sooner and more affordable than you might think. Finding the HUD home that’s right for you is no different than buying any other home — it takes the same amount of research. Unlike other homes on the market, a real estate agent is the only person who can legally show you a HUD home. Working with a realtor and sharing your wish list and desired area with them is the best way to find the HUD home that’s right for you.

There are government foreclosures in cities all across the country. If you have a specific area or neighborhood in mind, there’s a good chance you’ll find a HUD home in that area and at your desired price point. In some cases the previous owner has simply defaulted on their loan and moved out, leaving the house in excellent condition. However, there are some instances when the home has sustained damage. But if you’re handy, you may be able to benefit from purchasing a HUD home that comes with money in escrow with repairs or specific programs that offer funding for rehabilitating and repairing HUD properties.

Many first time homebuyers never even consider a HUD home because they believe it will be difficult for their bid to win against real estate investors. The truth of the matter is owner occupant buyers have an advantage over investors because investors are not allowed to bid on HUD homes until the property has been listed for 30 days. Working with a real estate agent to submit a competitive bid that’s more likely to be accepted is the best strategy.

Many first time homebuyers save a long time to come up with closing costs and escrow fees. Fortunately, help is available for these expenses when purchasing a HUD home. There are some cases when HUD will pay up to 3% of closing costs for buyers who have negotiated for it in their bid for the home. And depending on the situation, HUD will also pay the escrow fee, potentially saving homebuyers $350-$900. Savings like these make a huge difference when it comes to making the purchase of your new home more affordable.

In “When the Going Gets Tough the Tough Buy HUD Homes – Part II,” we will discuss due diligence, “As Is” foreclosures and things to consider when looking at properties that have been on the market for several months.

How to Calculate Your Mortgage Payoff

It’s a glorious day when the home mortgage is paid off. No longer does the bank have a claim on your home. You are the sole owner. Getting to that point takes time and payment after payment. Many people don’t live long enough to see that day, and others see it quite often as they pay off the mortgage every time they refinance the home. Continue reading “How to Calculate Your Mortgage Payoff”

Is Paying Off Your Mortgage Early a Good Idea?

It’s a question that weighs on many homeowners’ minds these days. Is it wise to pay off your mortgage early? The answer depends on your financial situation and there are good arguments that can be made either way. Here are several reasons why you should and shouldn’t pay off your mortgage early. Continue reading “Is Paying Off Your Mortgage Early a Good Idea?”

Buying a Home with No Money Down – USDA

Years ago, it was very easy to purchase a home with no money down, or 100% financing. Then this little thing hit called the “mortgage meltdown” hit in 2007 and everything changed where almost every program requires a borrower put some type of down payment on a purchase. However, there are still certain types of mortgages that will finance 100% of the purchase price of your home, they are a US Department of Agriculture(USDA) mortgage and a Veterans Administration(VA) mortgage. We will cover those today. Continue reading “Buying a Home with No Money Down – USDA”

Securing a Home Loan with Bad Credit – Part II

In “Securing a Home Loan with Bad Credit – Part I” we explored mitigating factors borrowers should consider highlighting when it comes to securing a home loan even when you have bad credit.  In addition to highlighting the financial assets you do have, your job security and proving your self-discipline as a saver rather than a spender, there are four other factors you should also highlight.
Continue reading “Securing a Home Loan with Bad Credit – Part II”

Securing a Home Loan with Bad Credit – Part I

When it comes to securing a home loan today one of the biggest misconceptions is that you need to have an excellent credit rating, a large down payment and low debt-to-income ratio with steady significant income.  But the truth is home ownership can happen even if you have bad credit due to a foreclosure or bankruptcy or if you have previously been turned down for a loan.  Here are some things to keep in mind.
Continue reading “Securing a Home Loan with Bad Credit – Part I”

Bank vs Mortgage Lender: What’s the Difference?

The Bank vs Mortgage Lender Difference

Homeowners seeking financing often ask what the difference between a bank and a mortgage lender is when it comes to doing a home loan. Whether it is a refinance home loan or a purchase home loan, there are distinct differences. A bank, as most people are very familiar with, primarily service checking accounts, savings accounts, CD’s, car loans, and sometimes “Home Equity Line of Credit” second mortgage loans. Some may even do first mortgage position loans, though not all. A Home Equity Line of Credit, also known as a HELOC is a secured home loan that is in second lien position to the primary first mortgage loan. This is referred to as a 2nd mortgage. A HELOC is usually a variable rate loan based on “Prime Rate”, which is an index based loan. Continue reading “Bank vs Mortgage Lender: What’s the Difference?”

Bi-Weekly Payments: Does it Save on My Mortgage?

Many people have enrolled in a bi-weekly payments program as a means to pay off their mortgage faster. Paying your mortgage payment every 2 weeks as opposed to each month does save you money. Over the life of a 30 year $150,000 mortgage at 4%, it will pay off your mortgage 4 years faster, saving approximately $17,000 in the process. Continue reading “Bi-Weekly Payments: Does it Save on My Mortgage?”

Should I get an FHA or Conventional Mortgage?

In today’s market, there are 4 types of mortgages available, Conventional, FHA, VA and USDA. Of those 4, Conventional and FHA are the most common so we’ll cover those, (VA mortgages are only available to US Veterans, and USDA mortgages only apply to certain homes in USDA sanctioned zip codes). Continue reading “Should I get an FHA or Conventional Mortgage?”

Buying a House in a Buyer’s Market Part Two

In “Buying a House in a Buyer’s Market – Part I,” we explored the importance of timing when it comes to buying a house in a buyer’s market. Finding the right house at the right price should be a buyer’s first and final goal with a long term plan of living there as a means of riding out bad market conditions that can occur. This time we’ll take a look at how technology and an experienced buyer’s agent, negotiating effectively and avoiding gimmicks are also essential when it comes to buying a house in a buyer’s market. Continue reading “Buying a House in a Buyer’s Market Part Two”

Buying a House in a Buyer’s Market – Part One

With falling housing prices, mortgage rates at all-time lows, millions of houses for sale and anxious sellers, many wonder if now is the best time to buy a house or not. In some cases, sellers aren’t just anxious, they’re down right desperate and with the number of sellers far outnumbering the number of buyers, things aren’t as clear-cut as they seem. In fact, this buyer’s market is complicated. Buy too soon and the figures could reduce by the time a buyer secures his mortgage, resulting in negative equity. Wait too long and someone could buy the house you’ve been eyeing for months out from under you. And you don’t want to get sidetracked by market forces that aren’t under your control either. Here are some strategies for buying a house in a buyer’s market. Continue reading “Buying a House in a Buyer’s Market – Part One”

Buying a Home After Foreclosure

If you’ve experienced foreclosure you might think you’ll never be in a position to buy another home again. Foreclosure certainly impacts your credit score but it’s only a matter of time before you can once again apply for a mortgage. The question many people have is how long they have to wait before buying a home after foreclosure. How long depends on the circumstances of your foreclosure, your ability to increase your credit score, the type of loan you’re prepared to apply for and the foreclosure waiting period. Continue reading “Buying a Home After Foreclosure”

What Does a No Cost Mortgage Refinance Mean?

You hear it all over the radio and see it all over the internet. “Refinance with No Cost”, which sounds a little…errr, maybe a lot too good to be true. Today we will talk about what is a no cost mortgage refinance, how does it work, and if it is right for you. Continue reading “What Does a No Cost Mortgage Refinance Mean?”

Can I Refinance My Home if I Owe More than its Worth?

You heard it all over the news through the course of the mortgage meltdown, “Home Values Down 10%…20%”. “Homeowners owe more that their homes are now worth.”

While cities in the Midwest like St. Louis, Kansas City and Indianapolis didn’t get hit as hard as other larger cities, everyone knew someone who lost a home or is struggling to manage bills, in any city.

Enter then, a market that has once in a generation interest rates that should be helping everyone with a mortgage recover financially, but for those who are upside down on their mortgage, they have been left on the outside, looking in leaving them unable to refinance on the basis that they owe more than their home is worth; in other words, they are, “upside down” on their mortgage. Continue reading “Can I Refinance My Home if I Owe More than its Worth?”

5 Tips for a Faster Mortgage Refi

With rates that come around once in a generation, everyone is in a rush to try to refinance their mortgage. However, with government regulations burying home owners and mortgage originators with mountains of disclosures, the process can seem daunting. However, here are some tips for you to be ready to make your next refinance as painless as possible.

1.       Have All of Your Documentation Ready….Yes All That Documentation.

File your taxes, get your w2’s, checkstubs and have bank statements ready.  Also in some cases, bankruptcy papers, divorce decrees. Continue reading “5 Tips for a Faster Mortgage Refi”

What You Should Know about a Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC)

A family’s most valuable asset is their home. Many homeowners use a Home Equity Loans or a Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC) to finance big ticket items like a child’s college education, home improvements and even medical bills. If you are considering a HELOC, you’ll want to take advantage of the best credit terms without subjecting yourself to any undue financial risks since inability to repay the borrowed amount plus interest could cost you your home. Here are some things to consider.

It’s important to understand the difference between a home equity loan and a Home Equity Line of Credit. With a home equity loan a lender agrees to loan a maximum amount for an agreed upon time period (a term) with the borrower’s equity in his or her home as collateral. Equity is the amount of money you would receive after selling your home and paying off the mortgage. Home equity loans provide homeowners a one-time advance with specific monthly payments and a specified time frame for repayment. Home equity loans are a convenient way to borrow money because of flexible terms and competitive rates.
Continue reading “What You Should Know about a Home Equity Line of Credit (HELOC)”

New FHA Streamline Rules Help Make Refinancing Easier

Effective June 11th 2012, new rules regarding FHA Streamlines will help some borrower refinance into lower rates.

While everyone is well aware of mortgage rates being at all time lows, access to those low mortgage rates remains tight, with credit score minimums,  increasing mortgage insurance premiums and falling home property values.

In the Midwest, St. Louis, Kansas City, and Indianapolis, home values have not been hit as hard, but still, many customers who make their mortgage payments on time have missed out on the benefits of these low rates because of inability to qualify.

Specifically, for those who have a HUD backed mortgage, increasing mortgage insurance premiums have become the largest obstacle to helping borrowers take advantage of lower rates, having gone through numerous premium increases as rates have fallen in recent years.

However, effective June 11th, 2012 some who have paid their FHA mortgage on time will have the opportunity to cheaply save money by lowering their rate, and mortgage insurance premiums(both upfront and monthly)

In order for a borrower to qualify, the following will be needed:

  1. Must have an existing FHA mortgage endorsed prior to May 31st, ,2009.(Endorsed, not closed)
  2.  Mortgage must be paid on time.
  3. May be done without an appraisal.

Upfront Mortgage Insurance Premiums (UFMIP) will be reduced from 1.75% currently being charges to .01%(yes. 01%)

Monthly premiums will be reduced from 1.25% on 30 year mortgages over 95% LTV to .55% on most loans.

So What does that translate to?

About $100 on a $175,000 30 year fixed rate refinance compared to today’s FHA mortgage insurance tables.