Making Your New House Feel Like a Home

After closing on a new home, many homeowners know a new house doesn’t feel like home when you first move in. Whether it still smells like the previous owners or it’s bigger than your previous home and the rooms just feel empty, it’s challenging to make your new house feel like home during that first week after the move. Here are some ways to make your new space your own, playing on all your senses.

Scents have powerful effects on us and your favorite smells can play a big role in making you feel more relaxed and at home in the new house. Light candles or incense throughout the rooms. To rid the house of the previous owner’s scent, or the smell of fresh paint, spray Febreze in all the rooms. The goal is to give your new home the same smell and atmosphere as your old one.Continue reading

Pre-Moving Day Tips for Pet Owners

Moving creates a lot of anxiety for pets, especially older pets, most cats and skittish pets. That’s why it’s important to do your homework and be prepared. Here are some pre-moving tips for pets that will make your move a smoother transition.

Many subdivisions in the St. Louis area and across the state have various ordinances and pet licensing requirements. Be sure you are familiar with these before you move in. You can familiarize yourself with your new home’s state/province laws by contacting the State Department of Agriculture or the State Veterinarian’s Office. In fact, depending on your new address, your pet may need additional medications, vaccinations or health certificates.
If your pet doesn’t like to travel, be sure to get your vet’s recommendations for behavior modification tactics or medication that can lessen the stress of travel. Your current vet may also be a valuable resource for lining up your pet’s vet in your new home town.
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Helping Your Kids Adjust to the Move

Relocating is challenging and can be especially scary for children. Guiding your child through the experience with patience and knowledge can make your family’s transition into your new home a fun adventure. Your current home may be the only one your child has ever known. Part of your child’s feeling safe in your existing home is his familiarity with the area, his neighborhood friends, the parks, schools and everything around it. From your child’s point of view, these items won’t exist anymore. Understanding your children’s concerns and needs will lessen the stress of the move for you and your family.

It’s important for parents to understand that kids have different concerns at different ages. For preschool children, moving elicits fears of being left behind or separated from their parents. Older kids between the ages of 6 and 12 have concerns about how their daily routines will be impacted. Teenagers worry about what a move will do to their social lives and about fitting in at their new school.
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