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When the Going Gets Tough the Tough Buy HUD Homes – Part 1

When the Going Gets Tough the Tough Buy HUD Homes – Part 1

When first time homebuyers start their search for a new home many are hesitant to consider looking at HUD homes because they are under the misconception that such properties

aren’tworth as much because they are located in blighted areas. This isn’t always true. The current housing market is flooded with HUD government foreclosures in areas at every price point, making a HUD home a viable option for achieving homeownership. Here are some things to consider when it comes purchasing a HUD home.

The good news about shopping for HUD homes is that there are plenty available on the market today. With so many HUD homes out there you’re bound to find one you like, making the dream of homeownership a reality sooner and more affordable than you might think. Finding the HUD home that’s right for you is no different than buying any other home — it takes the same amount of research. Unlike other homes on the market, a real estate agent is the only person who can legally show you a HUD home. Working with a realtor and sharing your wish list and desired area with them is the best way to find the HUD home that’s right for you.

There are government foreclosures in cities all across the country. If you have a specific area or neighborhood in mind, there’s a good chance you’ll find a HUD home in that area and at your desired price point. In some cases the previous owner has simply defaulted on their loan and moved out, leaving the house in excellent condition. However, there are some instances when the home has sustained damage. But if you’re handy, you may be able to benefit from purchasing a HUD home that comes with money in escrow with repairs or specific programs that offer funding for rehabilitating and repairing HUD properties.

Many first time homebuyers never even consider a HUD home because they believe it will be difficult for their bid to win against real estate investors. The truth of the matter is owner occupant buyers have an advantage over investors because investors are not allowed to bid on HUD homes until the property has been listed for 30 days. Working with a real estate agent to submit a competitive bid that’s more likely to be accepted is the best strategy.

Many first time homebuyers save a long time to come up with closing costs and escrow fees. Fortunately, help is available for these expenses when purchasing a HUD home. There are some cases when HUD will pay up to 3% of closing costs for buyers who have negotiated for it in their bid for the home. And depending on the situation, HUD will also pay the escrow fee, potentially saving homebuyers $350-$900. Savings like these make a huge difference when it comes to making the purchase of your new home more affordable.

In “When the Going Gets Tough the Tough Buy HUD Homes – Part II,” we will discuss due diligence, “As Is” foreclosures and things to consider when looking at properties that have been on the market for several months.